Beth Osten & Associates
Pediatric & Adult Therapy Services
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Self Evaluations

Helping to develop the underlying foundations needed for play, socialization, learning, and participation in daily living skills.


 

How do I know if my child will benefit from an occupational therapy, physical therapy, or speech-language evaluation?

We’ve included these assessments to help guide and inform you about some general milestones that may help you decide if an evaluation is the right next step for you.

 

Occupational Therapy Self Evaluations

Infant - OT Self Evaluation

General indicators that an INFANT may benefit from a speech-language evaluation, check all that apply:

  Easily startled (birth to 3 months).
  Poor muscle tone: floppy or stiff.
  Difficult to console, unusually fussy, suffers from colic.
  Had invasive medical procedures at birth or in early months (e.g. feeding tube, oxygen tube, surgeries)
  Slow to roll over, creep, sit or stand. Lack of rotation in movement
  Limited or no babbling.
  Difficulty maintaining eye contact.
  Frequent fisting of hands after six months.
  Limited exploration of environment.
  Dislikes baths, lotion, getting dressed and undressed, diaper changes.
  Becomes tense when held, dislikes being cuddled.
  Difficulty with nursing, frequent choking on milk/formula. Takes an extended period to finish bottle/nurse or fatigues after a short period, needing frequent feedings.
  Sleep difficulties.
  Difficulty tolerating new food textures (from 6 months).
  Sensitive to bright light, noises, smells, and/or visual stimuli (cries, turns away, falls asleep)
  Needs to be held for extensive periods of time or becomes very upset.
  Plays alone for long periods of time without seeking out caregiver, not needing much external stimuli to keep them content.
  Avoids lying on stomach, gets upset when placed on stomach.
  Has difficulty conforming body when being held

Downloadable PDF >


Toddler - OT Self Evaluation

General indicators that a TODDLER (3-5 years) may benefit from an occupational therapy evaluation, check all that apply:

  Has frequent temper tantrums; difficulty consoling self; unusually fussy.
  Becomes easily frustrated.
  Always on the run or prefers sedentary activities.
  Low muscle tone: appears weak or floppy; appears to be stiff.
  Delayed developmental milestones ????
  Avoids lying on stomach, gets upset when put on stomach.
  Dislikes baths, hair washing, teeth brushing, brushing hair.
  Limited verbal expression (limited babbling, less than 50 words at 2 years of age), difficult to understand.
  Limited exploration of environment or random exploration (e.g. pulling toys off shelves and tossing to side with brief to no regard).
  Has difficulty being dressed/undressed, prefers to be without clothes or prefers long sleeves/pants. Certain clothes, tags bothersome. Diaper changes difficult.
  Resists being held or becomes tense, dislikes being cuddled.
  Becomes upset in noisy/busy environment (e.g. birthday parties).
  Avoids or participates in a limited repertoire of fine and/or gross motor activities.
  Not showing interest in self-help activities (e.g. removing clothing, simple dressing tasks, eating with utensils).
  Difficulty with transitions.
  Difficulty maintaining eye contact.
  Poor eating habits; dislikes certain food textures, temperatures or tastes.
  Difficulty with chewing, blowing, or sucking.

Downloadable PDF >


Preschool Child - OT Self Evaluation

General indicators that a PRESCHOOL CHILD may benefit from a speech-language evaluation, check all that apply:

  Asks for excessive help during self-care or play activities or refuses to participate.
  Seems weak or floppy; Low muscle tone; Sits with “w” posture, leans for support.
  Appears clumsy-falls often, falls out of chair, difficulty running smoothly.
  Frequently bumps into things or people; often in personal space of others.
  Breaks toys or crayons easily. Uses a fisted grasp.
  Doesn’t like having feet off the ground (dislikes swings or jumping from surfaces).
  Not interested in fine motor activities: coloring, cutting, puzzles, manipulatives.
  Delayed language development.
  Very active, has difficulty slowing down, moves quickly, hard to stay with one activity.
  Difficulty focusing or tends to over-focus and have a hard time shifting to new task.
  Dislikes baths, swimming, haircuts, cutting nails, and or cuddling.
  Over-reacts to touch, taste, sounds, or odors. Covers ears around certain sounds.
  Avoids climbing on playground equipment.
  Difficulty settling down, sleep difficulties.
  Needs more practice than other children to learn new skills.
  Frequent temper tantrums, difficulty with transitions.
  Has difficulty joining groups of peers. Poor eating habits; very picky eater.
  Dislikes certain textures, temperatures, or tastes.
  Difficulty with chewing, blowing or sucking.

Downloadable PDF >

School-Age Child - OT Self Evaluation

General indicators that a SCHOOL-AGE CHILD may benefit from a speech-language evaluation, check all that apply:

  Difficulty focusing attention, following instructions, or over-focused and unable to shift to the next task.
  Low muscle tone; tends to lean on arms or slumps at desk.
  Needs more practice than other children to learn new skills.
  Very active, fidgets, has difficulty slowing down.
  Clumsy.
  Avoids jumping, climbing, and swinging.
  Dislikes gym class, sports, and motor based activities at recess.
  Dislikes handwriting, takes extensive time to write and/or fatigues.
  Reverses letters such as b and d; can’t space letters on the lines.
  Breaks crayons/pencils easily; uses excessive pressure, rips paper.
  Needs to frequently erase, not satisfied with written/drawn product.
  Poor self-esteem, lacks confidence.
  Sensitive/Over-reacts to touch, sounds, or odors.
  Limited food tolerances; resists trying new foods.
  Difficulty with transitions and/or unexpected changes in plans.
  Tends to be bossy with peers or withdraws from peer/group play.
  Rigid.
  Unorganized; messy desk/locker; frequently forgets assignments/homework.
  Difficulty with multi-step activities.
  Difficulty with personal boundaries; frequently touches people/objects.
  Difficulty making friends with same age peers

Downloadable PDF >


Speech-Language Self Evaluations

Infant - Speech Self Evaluation

General indicators that an INFANT may benefit from a speech-language evaluation, check all that apply:

  Does not react and turn towards loud sounds.
  Reduced vocalization of pleasure and displeasure sounds (laughs, cries, fusses, coos, gurgles).
  Rarely makes noises when talked to.
  Does not babble to self, others, and objects (ba-ba, ma-ma)
  Difficulty anticipating feeding-time upon sight of bottle; lacks recognition of bottle or spoon.
  Rarely responds to name by looking for voice (4-8 months).
  Has difficulty understanding “no”.
  Lacks different sounds for different states by 8 months (anger, contentment, hunger).
  Displays reduced use of actions or gestures to communicate with others by 8 months.
  Needs frequent assistance to follow simple 1-step commands or requests (come here, stop that, etc.) by 12 months.
  Does not use most sounds during “vocal play” by 12 months.
  Has limited display of affection around familiar people.
  Does not attempt to imitate novel sounds/actions by 12 months.
  Has difficulty directing other’s behaviors (physically or verbally).
  Has difficulty maintaining a suck-swallow sequence during bottle feeding, difficulty pacing, or difficulty finishing meal due to fatigue.
  Displays unease with feeding transitions (i.e. from liquids to pureed baby foods, with different textures, or from bottle to cup).
  Becomes extra sensitive when face or mouth is touched (i.e. while brushing teeth, feeding, wiping face).

Downloadable PDF >


Toddler - Speech Self Evaluation

General indicators that an TODDLER may benefit from a speech-language evaluation, check all that apply:

  Has difficulty following simple directions accompanied by gestures.
  Does not point to recognized or wanted objects, pictures, or family members.
  Cannot locate 3-4 body parts on self when named.
  Does not use 3 to 20 words spontaneously.
  Rarely imitates simple words or phrases.
  Has difficulty pronouncing most vowels and n, m, p, h, and other speech sounds
  Is not starting to combine words (i.e. “more milk”)
  Difficulty using and understanding spatial concepts (in, on, etc.)
  Speech is difficult to understand by caregivers, as well as strangers.
  Does not show interest in nor listen to frequently repeated nursery rhymes, jingles, familiar routines.
  Needs frequent repetition of instructions or demonstrations.
  Visual and auditory attention appears fleeting and/or unfocused.
  Has a few or no gestures.
  Shows inappropriate answers to very simple “wh” questions.
  Has no clear “yes” or “no” response.
  Does not use name or personal pronoun to refer to self.
  Does not use verbal greetings.
  Does not engage in imaginative play routines with toys.

Downloadable PDF >


Preschool Child - Speech Self Evaluation

General indicators that a PRESCHOOL CHILD may benefit from a speech-language evaluation, check all that apply:

  Asks for excessive help during self-care or play activities or refuses to participate.
  Seems weak or floppy; Low muscle tone; Sits with “w” posture, leans for support.
  Appears clumsy-falls often, falls out of chair, difficulty running smoothly.
  Frequently bumps into things or people; often in personal space of others.
  Breaks toys or crayons easily. Uses a fisted grasp.
  Doesn’t like having feet off the ground (dislikes swings or jumping from surfaces).
  Not interested in fine motor activities: coloring, cutting, puzzles, manipulatives.
  Delayed language development.
  Very active, has difficulty slowing down, moves quickly, hard to stay with one activity.
  Difficulty focusing or tends to over-focus and have a hard time shifting to new task.
  Dislikes baths, swimming, haircuts, cutting nails, and or cuddling.
  Over-reacts to touch, taste, sounds, or odors. Covers ears around certain sounds.
  Avoids climbing on playground equipment.
  Difficulty settling down, sleep difficulties.
  Needs more practice than other children to learn new skills.
  Frequent temper tantrums, difficulty with transitions.
  Has difficulty joining groups of peers. Poor eating habits; very picky eater.
  Dislikes certain textures, temperatures, or tastes.
  Difficulty with chewing, blowing or sucking.

Downloadable PDF >

School-Age Child - Speech Self Evaluation

General indicators that a SCHOOL-AGE CHILD may benefit from a speech-language evaluation, check all that apply:

  Difficulty focusing attention, following instructions, or over-focused and unable to shift to the next task.
  Low muscle tone; tends to lean on arms or slumps at desk.
  Needs more practice than other children to learn new skills.
  Very active, fidgets, has difficulty slowing down.
  Clumsy.
  Avoids jumping, climbing, and swinging.
  Dislikes gym class, sports, and motor based activities at recess.
  Dislikes handwriting, takes extensive time to write and/or fatigues.
  Reverses letters such as b and d; can’t space letters on the lines.
  Breaks crayons/pencils easily; uses excessive pressure, rips paper.
  Needs to frequently erase, not satisfied with written/drawn product.
  Poor self-esteem, lacks confidence.
  Sensitive/Over-reacts to touch, sounds, or odors.
  Limited food tolerances; resists trying new foods.
  Difficulty with transitions and/or unexpected changes in plans.
  Tends to be bossy with peers or withdraws from peer/group play.
  Rigid.
  Unorganized; messy desk/locker; frequently forgets assignments/homework.
  Difficulty with multi-step activities.
  Difficulty with personal boundaries; frequently touches people/objects.
  Difficulty making friends with same age peers.

Downloadable PDF >


Disclaimer: The materials provided on this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice or a substitute for medical consultation. Online readers should not take any action based on these materials without first obtaining the advice of a medical professional. Although Beth Osten & Associates strives to keep the information on this website current and accurate, the content found on this website may not reflect current medical developments. Beth Osten & Associates therefore assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or timeliness of information provided herein.

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